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Vox Media’s SSP launches

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Vox Media’s SSP launches

Vox Media is not going to mass-cull those vendors like other publishers.

It’s creating its own supply-side platform, which ad tech publishers often use but don’t usually own, to maximize impressions. The publisher’s ad operations execs use tech to optimize, manage and sell ad space on Athena, its ad unit, on sites such as SB Nation and The Verge aswell as premium publishers, which make up the local and national ad marketplace, Concert. This marketplace is extended by the SSP.

Successful as Concert has been since it launched in 2016, most of the dollars spent there have come via direct deals i.e. Not programmatic. Publishers selling inventory at scale can benefit from the use of ad tech, but only if these formats are standard. Vox has taken advantage of this bespoke SSP to make any item not standardized. Vox took a risk that very few publishers have taken since the introduction of programmatic.

” Owning our technology allows for us to be masters in our domain,” stated AJ Frucci (svp media revenue, head of Concert at Vox Media). “Having an ad product that isn’t standard and relying on third-party technology puts our product roadmap at risk .”

Larger publishers recognize the importance of autonomy. Many of them are looking to take advantage of the fact that marketers are keen to reduce the number of intermediaries involved in their bids. Publishers will benefit if this is done more often.

Normally, Vox publishers put their ads up for auction via multiple SSPs. This ensures that there are many exchange “paths” to bid on the same impression and drives up the price. This can be lucrative, but it can also lead to negative effects. There are more SSPs than publishers, which means that there are more ways for them to get a cut of the winning bid. This is not to mention more ways for audience data leakage to these businesses.

Vox’s own SSP allows Vox to overcome these problems without affecting its ability make money from multiple bids for the same impression. Or at least, it does so for a significant portion of its inventory.

Vox’s SSP sells Athena ads to marketers who have bid directly from The Trade Desk. Anyone who needs a different format, or uses a demand-side platform than The Trade Desk, must continue to do so through other SSPs. It is unlikely that this will continue for too long. It is already being considered to add other formats in the future, and to introduce demand-side platforms that can compete with them.

These updates are normal. Publishers shouldn’t spend so much money on their ad tech that it is stuck in the first gear. There are better ways to sell specific formats of ad to specific advertisers than to use a proprietary SSP.

“Our SSSP is designed to create a closer connection between a publisher-led market and the advertisers it serves, at a moment when most of the ecosystem’s assets are owned by third-party middlemen who have been built to commoditize size,” stated Frucci.

Vox’s SSP is a great example of this. It’s not about competing with other SSPs, but more about being able exert more control over the sale of some of its most valuable inventory. It doesn’t need to use technology required by another company to close a deal or to pay a fee for more media impressions. Vox has the ability to set even more terms. That’s the plan. The devil is always in the details in ad tech. Specifically, whether enough marketers will listen to these terms.

On one hand, it shouldn’t be a problem if Frucci has had a positive reaction to the launch.

On the other hand, he still needs to convert that reaction into money — a difficult task in an SSP market that is as crowded and undifferentiated as it is crowded. It won’t suffice to have an exclusive ad unit. This was not Vox’s ace-in-the-hole. The SSP’s true selling point is much more fundamental.

” The reason that private marketplace purchases outperformed those made on the open exchange last fiscal year is because buyers want quality. They want to know what they are buying,” stated Frucci. Powerful .”

is required to achieve this feat with creatives that are more powerful than the programmatic pipelines.

These aren’t just new soundbites. For many years, premium publishers have been encouraging marketers to be more careful about what they purchase. Marketers didn’t listen to those concerns for a variety of reasons. They are now. They are now getting organized to track and profile people without third-party cookie. The most scalable thing they can currently test is audiences curated from publishers. Forte, Vox’s first-party solution for data, will be integrated alongside Unified ID 2.0 in the Concert SSP.

Chances that Vox’s SSP doesn’t represent a trend. This operation is not possible for many publishers. SSP CEOs can rest easy.

” I think that since advertisers raised the issues of transparency and murkiness, some disintermediation has been inevitable,” stated Dan Larden of TPA’s U.K. division. “But I see only positives from it — as the need for the buy-side to demonstrate their value for money greater than ever. The way SSPs have created demand-side services and products has been brilliant. DSPs and curated marketplaces have improved their ability to connect better with inventory that every buyer desires .”

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USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

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USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign


Author: Mark Hachman
, Senior Editor

As PCWorld’s senior editor, Mark focuses on Microsoft news and chip technology, among other beats. He has formerly written for PCMag, BYTE, Slashdot, eWEEK, and ReadWrite.

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Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

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Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon


Author: Michael Crider
, Staff Writer

Michael is a former graphic designer who’s been building and tweaking desktop computers for longer than he cares to admit. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

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New Pixel Watch leak reveals watch faces, strap styles and more

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New Pixel Watch leak reveals watch faces, strap styles and more
Google Pixel watch



The Google Pixel Watch is incoming
(Image credit: Google)

We’re expecting the Google Pixel Watch to make its full debut on Thursday, October 6 – alongside the Pixel 7 and the Pixel 7 Pro – but in the meantime a major leak has revealed much more about the upcoming smartwatch.

Seasoned tipster @OnLeaks (opens in new tab) has posted the haul, which shows off some of the color options and band styles that we can look forward to next week. We also get a few shots of the watch interface and a picture of it being synced with a smartphone.

Watch faces are included in the leak too, covering a variety of different approaches to displaying the time – both in analog and digital formats. Another image shows the watch being used to take an ECG reading to assess heartbeat rate.

Just got my hands on a bunch of #Google #PixelWatch promo material showing all color options and Watch Bands for the first time. Some details revealed as well…@Slashleaks 👉🏻 https://t.co/HzbWeGGSKP pic.twitter.com/N0uiKaKXo0October 1, 2022

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Full colors

If the leak is accurate, then we’ve got four silicone straps on the way: black, gray, white, and what seems to be a very pale green. Leather straps look to cover black, orange, green and white, while there’s also a fabric option in red, black and green.

We already know that the Pixel Watch is going to work in tandem with the Fitbit app for logging all your vital statistics, and included in the leaked pictures is an image of the Pixel Watch alongside the Fitbit app running on an Android phone.

There’s plenty of material to look through here if you can’t wait until the big day – and we will of course be bringing you all the news and announcements as the Google event unfolds. It gets underway at 7am PT / 10am ET / 3pm BST / 12am AEDT (October 7).


Analysis: a big moment for Google

It’s been a fair while since Google launched itself into a new hardware category, and you could argue that there’s more riding on the Pixel Watch than there is on the Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro – as Google has been making phones for years at this point.

While Wear OS has been around for a considerable amount of time, Google has been leaving it to third-party manufacturers and partners to make the actual hardware. Samsung recently made the switch back to Wear OS for the Galaxy Watch 5 and the Galaxy Watch 5 Pro, for example.

Deciding to go through with its own smartwatch is therefore a big step, and it’s clear that Google is envious of the success of the Apple Watch. It’s the obvious choice for a wearable for anyone who owns an iPhone, and Google will be hoping that Pixel phones and Pixel Watches will have a similar sort of relationship.

What’s intriguing is how Fitbit fits in – the company is now run by Google, but so far we haven’t seen many signs of the Fitbit and the Pixel lines merging, even if the Pixel Watch is going to come with support for the Fitbit app.

Dave is a freelance tech journalist who has been writing about gadgets, apps and the web for more than two decades. Based out of Stockport, England, on TechRadar you’ll find him covering news, features and reviews, particularly for phones, tablets and wearables. Working to ensure our breaking news coverage is the best in the business over weekends, David also has bylines at Gizmodo, T3, PopSci and a few other places besides, as well as being many years editing the likes of PC Explorer and The Hardware Handbook.

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