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Ex-Amazon Cloud Worker Found Guilty in Capital One Hack

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Ex-Amazon Cloud Worker Found Guilty in Capital One Hack

The suspect in the massive 2019 data breach of Capital One was found guilty Friday of hacking and wire fraud charges. The Capital One hack, one of the largest-ever breaches of a financial services company, affected more than 100 million US customers and involved the theft of sensitive data including Social Security and bank account numbers.

The hacker, Paige A. Thompson, a former systems engineer at Amazon Web Services, used a self-made tool to detect misconfigured AWS accounts and then use those accounts to hack into the systems of more than 30 organizations, including Capital One, the US Department of Justice said in a release. In addition to downloading data, she planted cryptocurrency mining software on servers and directed crypto to her online wallet, the Justice Department said.

“She wanted data, she wanted money, and she wanted to brag,” Assistant United States Attorney Andrew Friedman said in closing arguments, according to the release. The Justice Department didn’t identify the other organizations affected by Thompson’s activity.

Following Thompson’s arrest, Amazon said she’d left the company three years before the hack took place. Last year, Capital One agreed to pay $190 million to settle a class-action lawsuit filed by customers. Both Capital One and Amazon Web Services denied liability but said they’d settle to avoid the time, expense and uncertainty of litigation.

The year before, Capital One agreed to pay $80 million to settle claims by federal bank regulators that its cybersecurity measures fell short and that it failed to put proper risk assessment steps in place when it started using cloud storage services. The regulators gave Capital One credit for how it notified customers after the hack and how it took steps to remedy problems. And the company said safeguards it had put in place before the breach helped it secure data before any customer information could be disseminated or used.

In addition to wire fraud, Thompson was found guilty of five counts of unauthorized access to a protected computer and damaging a protected computer, the Justice Department said. She was found not guilty of aggravated identity theft and access device fraud.

Thompson is scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 15, the Justice Department said, and faces up to 20 years in prison for wire fraud. Illegally accessing a protected computer and damaging a protected computer are punishable by up to five years in prison, the agency said.

A lawyer for Thompson didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment on the verdict.

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USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign

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USB logos finally make sense, thanks to a redesign


Author: Mark Hachman
, Senior Editor

As PCWorld’s senior editor, Mark focuses on Microsoft news and chip technology, among other beats. He has formerly written for PCMag, BYTE, Slashdot, eWEEK, and ReadWrite.

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Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon

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Cheaper OLED monitors might be coming soon


Author: Michael Crider
, Staff Writer

Michael is a former graphic designer who’s been building and tweaking desktop computers for longer than he cares to admit. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

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New Pixel Watch leak reveals watch faces, strap styles and more

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New Pixel Watch leak reveals watch faces, strap styles and more
Google Pixel watch



The Google Pixel Watch is incoming
(Image credit: Google)

We’re expecting the Google Pixel Watch to make its full debut on Thursday, October 6 – alongside the Pixel 7 and the Pixel 7 Pro – but in the meantime a major leak has revealed much more about the upcoming smartwatch.

Seasoned tipster @OnLeaks (opens in new tab) has posted the haul, which shows off some of the color options and band styles that we can look forward to next week. We also get a few shots of the watch interface and a picture of it being synced with a smartphone.

Watch faces are included in the leak too, covering a variety of different approaches to displaying the time – both in analog and digital formats. Another image shows the watch being used to take an ECG reading to assess heartbeat rate.

Just got my hands on a bunch of #Google #PixelWatch promo material showing all color options and Watch Bands for the first time. Some details revealed as well…@Slashleaks 👉🏻 https://t.co/HzbWeGGSKP pic.twitter.com/N0uiKaKXo0October 1, 2022

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Full colors

If the leak is accurate, then we’ve got four silicone straps on the way: black, gray, white, and what seems to be a very pale green. Leather straps look to cover black, orange, green and white, while there’s also a fabric option in red, black and green.

We already know that the Pixel Watch is going to work in tandem with the Fitbit app for logging all your vital statistics, and included in the leaked pictures is an image of the Pixel Watch alongside the Fitbit app running on an Android phone.

There’s plenty of material to look through here if you can’t wait until the big day – and we will of course be bringing you all the news and announcements as the Google event unfolds. It gets underway at 7am PT / 10am ET / 3pm BST / 12am AEDT (October 7).


Analysis: a big moment for Google

It’s been a fair while since Google launched itself into a new hardware category, and you could argue that there’s more riding on the Pixel Watch than there is on the Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro – as Google has been making phones for years at this point.

While Wear OS has been around for a considerable amount of time, Google has been leaving it to third-party manufacturers and partners to make the actual hardware. Samsung recently made the switch back to Wear OS for the Galaxy Watch 5 and the Galaxy Watch 5 Pro, for example.

Deciding to go through with its own smartwatch is therefore a big step, and it’s clear that Google is envious of the success of the Apple Watch. It’s the obvious choice for a wearable for anyone who owns an iPhone, and Google will be hoping that Pixel phones and Pixel Watches will have a similar sort of relationship.

What’s intriguing is how Fitbit fits in – the company is now run by Google, but so far we haven’t seen many signs of the Fitbit and the Pixel lines merging, even if the Pixel Watch is going to come with support for the Fitbit app.

Dave is a freelance tech journalist who has been writing about gadgets, apps and the web for more than two decades. Based out of Stockport, England, on TechRadar you’ll find him covering news, features and reviews, particularly for phones, tablets and wearables. Working to ensure our breaking news coverage is the best in the business over weekends, David also has bylines at Gizmodo, T3, PopSci and a few other places besides, as well as being many years editing the likes of PC Explorer and The Hardware Handbook.

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